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March 26, 2013

California Spotted Owl in Peril

Read the latest Sierra Voice Newsletter

 

March 12, 2013

Forest Plan Revisions: Scoping to begin in April; Meetings and workshops scheduled

 

December 30, 2013

Forest Plan Revisions:

Final Forest Assessments completed for Inyo, Sequoia, and Sierra National Forests

Forest Service releases "Preliminary Need for Change" statement, and public meetings are scheduled

 

December 10, 2013

Read the latest Sierra Forest Voice Newsletter

 

December 6, 2013

Stanislaus National Forest issues Notice of Intent to salvage log 29,648 acres within the Rim Fire

 

November 22, 2013

Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit Final Forest Plan and EIS is now available -- objections may be filed until January 21, 2014

 

November 18, 2013

Inyo National Forest Forest Assessment now available for public review

Comments due December 16, 2013

 

Read our coalition's comments on latest Forest Service assessments:

Bald Mountain Project--Dinkey Collaborative

Sierra National Forest Forest Assessment

Sequoia National Forest Forest Assessment

 

September 29, 2013

Boulder Burn prescribed burn in Sequoia National

Learn more here

 

August 5, 2013

Modesto Bee: Amphibian proposal also helps people

 

June 15, 2013

Read Sierra Forest Legacy comments on the Forest Service's draft Sierra Nevada Bioregional Assessment

Updates on forest plan revisions in the SN

 

April 25, 2013

In danger of extinction: FWS proposes endangered species status for Mountain Yellow-Legged Frog

Threatened status for Yosemite Toad

 

April 12, 2013

Sierra National Forest begins forest plan revision process

 

January 15, 2013

Science Synthesis from PSW:

Science Synthesis to Support Land and Resource Management Plan Revision in the Sierra Nevada and Southern Cascades

 

October 4, 2012

From the Institute for Bird Populations and Partners in Flight:

A Conservation Strategy for the Black-backed Woodpecker in California

Read more about the black-backed woodpecker, here.

 

September 4, 2012

Giant Sequoia Monument Management Plan final EIS and ROD released

 

August 29, 2012

LTBMU Draft LRMP and DEIS -- Read Sierra Forest Legacy's comments

 

August 25, 2012

Sierra Forest Legacy introduces a Conservation Strategy for the Sierra Nevada

 

July 30, 2012

Status of 145 bird species in the Sierra Nevada National Parks Network

 

June 4, 2012

MIS lawsuit settlement: Science panel to review Forest Service's choice of management indicator species

 

Biodiversity of the Sierra Nevada...Learn More Here

 

Climate Change and Sierra Nevada Forests

Get the facts here.

 

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However, timber salvage will rarely achieve any positive ecological benefit...Timber salvage should be viewed as a “tax” or debit on the recovery process. Removal of large, decay resistant snags and logs is particularly negative because of impacts on long-term recovery and stand development processes. —Jerry Franklin, Testimony to Congress, 2004

A Conservation Strategy

Conservation in the Sierra Nevada: Issues and Recommendations

In preparation for a new cycle of forest planning on national forests in the Sierra Nevada, Sierra Forest Legacy and our conservation partners have developed a conservation strategy designed to set a new standard for conservation planning in the region, one that meets the challenges of the critical issues of our time.

Download the whole Conservation Strategy The resulting document, National Forests in the Sierra Nevada: A Conservation Strategy, was released in 2012. It contains detailed information and recommendations on a variety of topic areas relative to conservation in the forests of the Sierra Nevada. Click on any of the topic areas below to go directly to the chapter pages. We've also created a home page hub for the Strategy, linking associated documents and other resources.

Download the documents from the Conservation Strategy homepage.

Download the whole document (2 MB)

Decision Support Maps and Recommendations for Conserving Rare Carnivores in the Interior Mountains of California (6 MB PDF)

Conservation of Freshwater Ecosystems on Sierra Nevada National Forests -- Policy Analysis and Recommendations for the Future (13.97 MB PDF)

SNEP Plus 15 Years: Ecological and Conservation Science for Freshwater Resource Protection and Federal Land Management in the Sierra Nevada (576 KB PDF)

 

Managing Sierra Nevada Forests

New Technical Report (PSW-GTR-237)

Managing Sierra Nevada Forests

Since its publication in 2009, and with widespread acceptance throughout the region, GTR-220--An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests—has revolutionized national forest management in the Sierra Nevada. This new report, edited by PSW research ecologist Malcolm North, provides a collection of papers relevant to implementation of the GTR over the last two years, and provides additional scientific information for several key Sierran wildlife species, including the California spotted owl, American marten, and Pacific fisher. The report also provides new tools for project level planning to aid in successful implementation, and additional clarification of the principles of the new approach. With chapters on fire and fuels reduction, bark beetles, climate change, collaboration, case studies where the GTR has been implemented--and an appendix of photographs of forest structure illustrating wildlife habitat--the publication is certain to be a valuable tool that will help to increase forest heterogeneity and resilience in the Sierra Nevada.

Download the report here (8 MB PDF). You may also order a hard copy of the report from the Forest Service, details at this website.

North, Malcolm, ed. 2012. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-237. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 184 p.

 

An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests (PSW-GTR-220)

A new report from Pacific Southwest Research Station (with addendum, February, 2010)

An Ecosystem Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests We applaud this new technical report from the Forest Service Sierra Nevada Research Center, Pacific Southwest Research Station. Authors Malcolm North, Peter Stine, Kevin O'Hara, William Zielinkski, and Scott Stephens present a clearly articulated restoration strategy for the mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, based on synthesis of an important large body of recent research from a variety of scientific disciplines, including forest ecology, silviculture, wildlife biology, and fire science. This new platform for refining ecological restoration in the Sierra Nevada is precisely what is needed at this juncture.

The ecosystem management strategy presented represents an enlightened approach to managing Sierra Nevada ecosystems that is firmly rooted in core ecological principles.

Emphasis goals of the strategy include increasing heterogeneity at multiple scales, greater use of fire for multiple benefits, increasing connectivity (reducing fragmentation), and facilitating greater resiliency of forest landscapes to withstand climate impacts and other changes. The suggestions for thinning would move the agency away from reliance on outmoded and uniform silvicultural prescriptions, and would result in more diverse configurations of cohorts of trees in clumped spacing and retention of multi-aged stands. Guided by ecological thinking, the researchers suggest a management approach that mimics natural processes.

If implemented across the mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, the strategy should result in preservation and restoration of vital wildlife habitat for species like the imperiled Pacific fisher and California spotted owl, and the many associated plants and animals that require complex, old forest habitats. This ecological approach would also ensure the continuity of the entire succession of diverse plant communities and wildlife in Sierran forest landscapes.

Sierran mixed conifer forests today are highly disturbed and fragmented from overly aggressive fire suppression practices and forest management policies. The result has been an entrainment towards homogenous landscapes and loss of biodiversity. New, evolving fire policies and thoughtful ecosystem approaches to management are currently being debated and largely embraced by the conservation community. Increasing the level of ecology-focused scientific research that can inform management is a key goal for Sierra Forest Legacy and our partner groups.

The authors include a list of research and monitoring needs to further refine the strategy specific to Sierra Nevada forests. The report is a welcome breath of fresh air in the haze of ideological wrangling obscuring the urgency of reaching sustainable management goals for Sierra Nevada forest ecosystems.

Download the GTR here (2nd printing February 2010, with addendum, 1.40 MB PDF). You may also order a hard copy of the report from the Forest Service, details at this website.

North, Malcolm; Peter Stine, Kevin O'Hara, William Zielinski, and Scott Stephens. 2009. An Ecosystem Management Strategy for Sierran Mixed-Conifer Forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-220. Albany, CA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station. 49 p.

 


"A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it does otherwise."
~Aldo Leopold